Ellie Wood Keith Genealogy

Guy I De Monthlery

Guy I De Monthlery

Male - 1095

Personal Information    |    Media    |    Sources    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Guy I De Monthlery 
    Born Montlhery, Ile de France, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    History Son of Milon de Monteleherico, Gui I was lord of Monthléry and Chevreuse as well as Châteaufort and Bray. With his wife Hodierne de Gometz-la-Ferté, daughter of Guillaume de Gometz-la-Ferté, seigneur de Bures, he had seven children who would all have progeny.

    Gui founded the abbey of Longpont, where late in life he became a monk and where he died in 1095, the same year Pope Urban II launched the First Crusade. Many of his descendants had illustrious careers in the Holy Land, through the Montlhéry, Courtenay, and Le Puiset branches of his family.  [1
    History The Montlhéry noble house was related to the Montmorency family; Thibaud, the founder of the Montlhéry dynasty, was the brother of Bouchard II, the progenitor of the Montmorency house. Thibaud ruled from 970 to 1031 and was succeeded by his son Guy I, who ruled until 1095. Guy I\'s children married into other local noble families: his daughter Melisende married Hugh, count of Rethel, and another daughter Elizabeth married Joscelin of Courtenay. Through these marriages and subsequent Montlhéry participation on the First Crusade, Guy I was the ancestor of the ruling dynasties of the crusader Kingdom of Jerusalem and the County of Edessa. Another daughter, Alice, married into the Le Puiset family, and a son, Guy, became count of Rochefort. Guy I was succeeded by Milo I, followed by Milo\'s sons Guy II and Milo II. In 1118, after many disputes with the rebellious lords, Louis VI of France ordered the castle to be dismantled and turned the town into a royal residence. Louis VI had himself been married to a granddaughter of Guy I, Lucienne of Rochefort, from 1104 to 1107.

    After being absorbed into the royal domain, Montlhéry became part of the territory governed by the viscount of Paris. In the early 13th century, the French king Philip II (Augustus) completely rebuilt the castle in the contemporary style, at a new site high above the town.

    During the Hundred Years\' War, the town and the castle frequently passed between English and French forces. On 16 July 1465, Charles the Bold defeated Louis XI of France at the Battle of Montlhéry. The town was left in ruins by the Wars of Religion, but it was rebuilt in 1591 under Henry IV.  [2
    Died 24 Jul 1095  France, age 24 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Abbaye de Longpont, Aisne, France Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I551  Ellie Wood Keith
    Last Modified 6 Mar 2018 

    Father Milon, de Monteleherico,   d. yes 
    Relationship putative 
    Relationship putative 
    Family ID F1280  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 1 Hodierne De Gometz,   b. Gometz, Ile de France, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1108, France, age 24 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Guy II De Montlhery,   d. 1107, France Find all individuals with events at this location
    +2. Melisende, de Monthlery  [putative]
    Last Modified 6 Mar 2018 
    Family ID F291  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 2 Hodierne De Gometz,   b. Gometz, Ile de France, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1108, France, age 24 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Hodierne de Mothlery
    Last Modified 18 Mar 2018 
    Family ID F1433  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family 3 Hodierne De Gometz,   b. Gometz, Ile de France, France Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1108, France, age 24 Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
    +1. Elisabeth de Monthiery
    Last Modified 28 Apr 2018 
    Family ID F2098  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Monthléry
    Monthléry
    Montlhéry lay on the strategically important road from Paris to Orléans. Under the Merovingians, it was owned by the church in Reims and in 768 it was given to the abbey of St. Denis in Paris. It was the site of a number of battles between the lords of Montlhéry and the early Capetian monarchy.
    Montihery coat of arms
    Montihery coat of arms

  • Sources 
    1. [S64] Genealogics, Leo Van de Pas, http://www.genealogics.org/getperson.php?personID=I00106272&tree=LEO.

    2. [S12] Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montlhéry.