Ellie Wood Keith Genealogy

Noah

Noah

Male - yes

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  • Name Noah  
    Gender Male 
    History This article is about the biblical Noah. For other uses, see Noah (disambiguation).
    Noah

    Noah\'s Sacrifice by Daniel Maclise
    Venerated in
    Judaism
    Christianity
    Islam
    Mandaeism
    Baha\'i Faith
    In the Abrahamic religions, Noah[a] (/?no?.?/)[1] was the tenth and last of the pre-Flood Patriarchs. The story of Noah\'s Ark is told in the Bible\'s Genesis flood narrative. The biblical account is followed by the story of the Curse of Canaan.
    In addition to the Book of Genesis, Noah is mentioned in the Old Testament in the First Book of Chronicles, and the books of Tobit, Wisdom, Sirach, Isaiah, Ezekiel, 2 Esdras, 4 Maccabees; in the New Testament, he is mentioned in the gospels of Matthew, and Luke, the Epistle to the Hebrews, 1st Peter and 2nd Peter. Noah was the subject of much elaboration in the literature of later Abrahamic religions, including the Quran (Surahs 71, 7, 1, and 21).

    Contents  [hide] 
    1
    Biblical account
    1.1
    Genesis flood narrative
    1.2
    After the flood
    1.3
    Noah\'s drunkenness
    1.4
    Curse of Ham
    1.5
    Table of nations
    2
    Family tree
    3
    Narrative analysis
    4
    Other accounts
    4.1
    Pseudepigrapha
    4.2
    Dead Sea scrolls
    5
    Comparative mythology
    5.1
    Mesopotamian
    5.2
    Sumerian
    5.3
    Ancient Greek
    6
    Religious views
    6.1
    Judaism
    6.2
    Christianity
    6.2.1
    Isaac Newton
    6.2.2
    Mormon theology
    6.3
    Islam
    6.4
    Gnostic
    6.5
    Bahá\'í
    7
    See also
    8
    Notes
    9
    References
    10
    Bibliography
    11
    External links

    Biblical account[edit]


    12th-century Venetian mosaic depiction of Noah sending the dove
    The primary account of Noah in the Bible is in the Book of Genesis.
    Noah was the tenth of the pre-flood (antediluvian) Patriarchs. His father was Lamech and his mother is unknown.[2] When Noah was five hundred years old, he became the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth (Genesis 5:32).
    Genesis flood narrative[edit]
    Main article: Genesis flood narrative
    The Genesis flood narrative makes up chapters 6–9 in the Book of Genesis, in the Bible.[3] The narrative, one of many flood myths found in human cultures, indicates that God intended to return the Earth to its pre-Creation state of watery chaos by flooding the Earth because of humanity\'s misdeeds and then remake it using the microcosm of Noah\'s ark. Thus, the flood was no ordinary overflow but a reversal of creation.[4] The narrative discusses the evil of mankind that moved God to destroy the world by the way of the flood, the preparation of the ark for certain animals, Noah, and his family, and God\'s guarantee (the Noahic Covenant) for the continued existence of life under the promise that he would never send another flood.[5]
    After the flood[edit]
    Main article: Covenant (biblical) § Noahic covenant
    After the flood, Noah offered burnt offerings to God, who said: \"I will not again curse the ground any more for man\'s sake; for the imagination of man\'s heart [is] evil from his youth; neither will I again smite any more every thing living, as I have done.\" (8:20–21)
    \"And God blessed Noah and his sons, and said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth.\" (9:1) They were also told that all fowls, land animals, and fishes would be afraid of them. Furthermore, as well as green plants, every moving thing would be their food with the exception that the blood was not to be eaten. Man\'s life blood would be required from the beasts and from man. \"Whoso sheddeth man\'s blood, by man shall his blood be shed: for in the image of God made he man.\" (9:6) A rainbow, called \"my bow\", was given as the sign of a covenant \"between me and you and every living creature that [is] with you, for perpetual generations\", (9:2–17) called the Noahic covenant or the rainbow covenant.
    Noah died 350 years after the flood, at the age of 950,[6] the last of the extremely long-lived antediluvian Patriarchs. The maximum human lifespan, as depicted by the Bible, diminishes rapidly thereafter, from almost 1,000 years to the 120 years of Moses.[7]
    Noah\'s drunkenness[edit]


    Noah\'s drunkenness, Ham mocks Noah, Noah is covered, Canaan is cursed. Egerton Genesis
    After the flood, the bible says that Noah became a husbandman and he planted a vineyard. He drank wine made from this vinyard, and got drunk; and lay \"uncovered\" within his tent. Noah\'s son Ham, the father of Canaan, saw his father naked and told his brothers, which led to Ham\'s son Canaan being cursed by Noah.[8] As early as the Classical era, commentators on Genesis 9:20–21 have excused Noah\'s excessive drinking because he was considered to be the first wine drinker; the first person to discover the soothing, consoling, and enlivening[tone] effects of wine.[9] John Chrysostom, Archbishop of Constantinople, and a Church Father, wrote in the 4th Century that Noah\'s behaviour is defensible: as the first human to taste wine, he would not know its effects: \"Through ignorance and inexperience of the proper amount to drink, fell into a drunken stupor\".[10]
    Philo, a Hellenistic Jewish philosopher, also excused Noah by noting that one can drink in two different manners: (1) to drink wine in excess, a peculiar sin to the vicious evil man or (2) to partake of wine as the wise man, Noah being the latter.[11]
    In Jewish tradition and rabbinic literature on Noah, rabbis blame Satan for the intoxicating properties of the wine.[12][13]
    Curse of Ham[edit]
    Main article: Curse of Ham


    Noah curses Ham by Gustave Dore
    In the field of psychological biblical criticism, J. H. Ellens and W. G. Rollins address the narrative of Genesis 9:18–27 that narrates the unconventional behavior that occurs between Noah and Ham. Because of its brevity and textual inconsistencies, it has been suggested that this narrative is a \"splinter from a more substantial tale\".[14][15] A fuller account would explain what exactly Ham had done to his father, or why Noah directed a curse at Canaan for Ham\'s misdeed, or how Noah came to know what occurred. The narrator relates two facts: (1) Noah became drunken and \"he was uncovered within his tent\", and (2) Ham \"saw the nakedness of his father, and told his two brethren without\". Thus, these passages revolve around sexuality and the exposure of genitalia as compared with other Hebrew Bible texts, such as Habakkuk 2:15 and Lamentations 4:21.[16]
    Table of nations[edit]


    The dispersion of the descendants of Shem, Ham, and Japheth (map from the 1854 Historical Textbook and Atlas of Biblical Geography)
    See also: Sons of Noah
    Genesis 10 sets forth the descendants of Shem, Ham, and Japheth, from whom the nations branched out over the earth after the flood. Among Japheth’s descendants were the maritime nations. (10:2–5) Ham’s son Cush had a son named Nimrod, who became the first man of might on earth, a mighty hunter, king in Babylon and the land of Shinar. (10:6–10) From there Asshur went and built Nineveh. (10:11–12) Canaan’s descendants – Sidon, Heth, the Jebusites, the Amorites, the Girgashites, the Hivites, the Arkites, the Sinites, the Arvadites, the Zemarites, and the Hamathites – spread out from Sidon as far as Gerar, near Gaza, and as far as Sodom and Gomorrah. (10:15–19) Among Shem’s descendants was Eber. (10:21)
    These genealogies differ structurally from those set out in Genesis 5 and 11. It has a segmented or treelike structure, going from one father to many offspring. It is strange that the table, which assumes that the population is distributed about the Earth, precedes the account of the Tower of Babel, which says that all the population is in one place before it is dispersed.[17]
    Family tree[edit]
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Adam
     
    Eve
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Cain
     
     
     
    Abel
     
     
     
    Seth

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


     
     
     
     
    Enoch
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Enos

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


     
     
     
     
    Irad
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Kenan

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


     
     
     
     
    Mehujael
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Mahalalel

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


     
     
     
     
    Methushael
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Jared

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


    Adah
     
    Lamech
     
     
     
    Zillah
     
     
     
    Enoch
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Jabal
     
    Jubal
     
    Tubal-Cain
     
    Naamah
     
    Methuselah

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Lamech

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     


     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Noah

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Shem
     
    Ham
     
    Japheth

    Narrative analysis[edit]  [1
    Died yes 
    Person ID I1003  Ellie Wood Keith
    Last Modified 5 Jan 2018 

    Father Lamech,   d. yes 
    Family ID F584  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Emzara,   d. yes 
    Children 
    +1. Japeth,   d. yes  [putative]
     2. Shem,   d. yes  [putative]
     3. Ham,   d. yes  [putative]
    Last Modified 5 Jan 2018 
    Family ID F583  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Photos
    Noah
    Noah
    Adam and Eve Genealogy
    Adam and Eve Genealogy

  • Sources 
    1. [S12] Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah.