Ellie Wood Keith Genealogy

Notes


Matches 1 to 37 of 37

     

 #   Notes   Linked to 
1 "Here Lies Col. William Randolph Founder of Randolph Family
1651-1711." Virginia Conservation Com. 1946.
William Randolph, settled at Turkey Island in the early 1680s, near the head of the tidewater on the James River, built up a large estate, and became one of the most influential political leaders of his generation. He was the 26th Speaker of the Virginia House of Burgesses in 1698. By the time of his death in 1711, he had established a leading dynasty and was able to bequeath thousands of acres of land to his children. Taking advantage of opportunities in the interior, his sons moved further upriver: Richard settled at Curles Neck, Thomas far beyond the falls at Tuckahoe (the first great plantation on the upper James), and Isham further upriver still. As a young man Isham had gone to sea, become a successful merchant, and lived for many years in London, serving as an agent for Virginia affairs. In 1718 he married Jane Rogers and three years later their daughter, Jane, was baptized at St. Paul's Church, Shadwell. Jane Randolph, Thomas Jefferson's mother, was English by birth and spent her childhood in London surrounded by the busy streets and docklands of the East End, before moving to her father's plantation at Dungeness in the frontier county of Goochland.
The Randolph Family Cemetery on the South-West side of the old Turkey Island Plantation. The Turkey Island Plantation is NOT on Turkey Island, but across the James River, north of Turkey Island. The family plot is now on private property and the owner does not allow people to visit the walled in cemetery.(according to G. Parsons).

Family links:
Parents:
Richard Randolph (1621 - 1678)
Elizabeth Ryland Randolph (1621 - 1669)

Spouse:
Mary Isham Randolph (1659 - 1735)

Children:
Elizabeth Randolph Bland (1680 - 1720)*
William Randolph (1681 - 1742)*
Thomas Randolph (1683 - 1729)*
Elizabeth Randolph (1685 - 1685)*
Isham Randolph (1685 - 1742)*
Mary Randolph Stith (1686 - 1742)*
Edward Randolph (1690 - 1737)*
John Randolph (1693 - 1737)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Randolph Family Cemetery Presque Isle
Henrico County
Virginia, USA

Created by: Kaaren Crail Vining
Record added: Nov 19, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 16714316
 
Randolph, of Turkey Island, William (I121)
 
2 .Westover was built circa 1730 by William Byrd II, the founder of Richmond. It is noteworthy for its secret passages, magnificent gardens, and architectural details. The grounds and garden are open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, but the house is not open to the public. Westover was named for Henry West, fourth Lord Delaware and son of Thomas West, Governor of Virginia. The shady tulip poplars framing the building are more than 150 years old. "Ancient" is the best word to describe the boxwood hedges which enclose the lawn. The house is considered one of the most outstanding example of Georgian architecture in America. Of special notice is the unusually steepness of the roof, the tall chimneys in pairs at both ends. Another special touch is the elaborate doorway, which continues to be recognized as "the Westover doorway" despite its adaptation to many other buildings. The special charm of the house lies in its elegant yet extremely simple form and proportions, combined with its perfect setting in the landscape, the essence of the artistic ideals of its period adapted to the style of living in Colonial Virginia. The two wings were originally identical and not connected to the three-story central structure. The east wing, which once contained the famous Byrd library of more than 4,000 volumes, burned during the War Between the States. The present east wing was built about 1900, and both wings were connected to the main home at that time.

Just east of the house is the ice-house and a small structure containing a dry well with passageways which led under the house and to the river, as an escape from the Indians. Each building has a light switch just inside the door. Across the driveway from the ice-house is the Necessary House.

Turning from the river to the north side of the house, the visitor will find the famous Westover gates, with William Evelyn Byrd's initials incorporated in the delicate ironwork. The lead eagles on the gateposts are a play on the name "Byrd." The wrought-iron fence has supporting columns topped by unusual stone finials cut to resemble an acorn for perseverance (from little acorns great oaks grow); a pineapple for hospitality, a Greek Key to the World for knowledge; a cornucopia, or horn of plenty: a beehive for industry; and an urn of flowers for beauty.

Continuing to circle the house, the visitor will come to the formal gardens, which were re-established about 1900. At the center, where the paths cross, is the handsome tomb with its interesting epitaph honoring the colorful William Byrd I, "Black Swan of Westover," who was buried there in 1744.

His daughter, the beautiful and tragic Evelyn Byrd, is buried near the original site of Westover Church, up the river a quarter-mile west of the house. There also are buried Theodorick Bland, from whom William Byrd I bought the Westover property in 1688; William Byrd I and his wife, the former Mary Horsemanden; and other distinguished early Virginians. Here also, according to some historians, is the third oldest known tombstone in America--that of Captain William Perry, who died August 6, 1637. The arms and epitaph engraved on this stone have been effaced by the elements in recent years. 
Byrd, Col. William II (I1000324)
 
3 .Westover was built circa 1730 by William Byrd II, the founder of Richmond. It is noteworthy for its secret passages, magnificent gardens, and architectural details. The grounds and garden are open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily, but the house is not open to the public. Westover was named for Henry West, fourth Lord Delaware and son of Thomas West, Governor of Virginia. The shady tulip poplars framing the building are more than 150 years old. "Ancient" is the best word to describe the boxwood hedges which enclose the lawn. The house is considered one of the most outstanding example of Georgian architecture in America. Of special notice is the unusually steepness of the roof, the tall chimneys in pairs at both ends. Another special touch is the elaborate doorway, which continues to be recognized as "the Westover doorway" despite its adaptation to many other buildings. The special charm of the house lies in its elegant yet extremely simple form and proportions, combined with its perfect setting in the landscape, the essence of the artistic ideals of its period adapted to the style of living in Colonial Virginia. The two wings were originally identical and not connected to the three-story central structure. The east wing, which once contained the famous Byrd library of more than 4,000 volumes, burned during the War Between the States. The present east wing was built about 1900, and both wings were connected to the main home at that time.

Just east of the house is the ice-house and a small structure containing a dry well with passageways which led under the house and to the river, as an escape from the Indians. Each building has a light switch just inside the door. Across the driveway from the ice-house is the Necessary House.

Turning from the river to the north side of the house, the visitor will find the famous Westover gates, with William Evelyn Byrd's initials incorporated in the delicate ironwork. The lead eagles on the gateposts are a play on the name "Byrd." The wrought-iron fence has supporting columns topped by unusual stone finials cut to resemble an acorn for perseverance (from little acorns great oaks grow); a pineapple for hospitality, a Greek Key to the World for knowledge; a cornucopia, or horn of plenty: a beehive for industry; and an urn of flowers for beauty.

Continuing to circle the house, the visitor will come to the formal gardens, which were re-established about 1900. At the center, where the paths cross, is the handsome tomb with its interesting epitaph honoring the colorful William Byrd I, "Black Swan of Westover," who was buried there in 1744.

His daughter, the beautiful and tragic Evelyn Byrd, is buried near the original site of Westover Church, up the river a quarter-mile west of the house. There also are buried Theodorick Bland, from whom William Byrd I bought the Westover property in 1688; William Byrd I and his wife, the former Mary Horsemanden; and other distinguished early Virginians. Here also, according to some historians, is the third oldest known tombstone in America--that of Captain William Perry, who died August 6, 1637. The arms and epitaph engraved on this stone have been effaced by the elements in recent years. 
Byrd, Col. William II (I1000324)
 
4

 Of the men of Virginia descent living in other states may be mentioned James Jellis Page, killed in Flanders, Sept. 29th. He was son of Rev. J. J. Page, whose father Henry Page (a son of Major Carter Page, of the Revolution) removed from Cumberland Co., Va., to Todd Co., Ky. 

de Camp to Lafayette

 
PAGE, Major Carter (I500118)
 
5

 Of the men of Virginia descent living in other states may be mentioned James Jellis Page, killed in Flanders, Sept. 29th. He was son of Rev. J. J. Page, whose father Henry Page (a son of Major Carter Page, of the Revolution) removed from Cumberland Co., Va., to Todd Co., Ky. 

de Camp to Lafayette

 
Page, Major Carter (I1000310)
 
6


Notes for James Murray Mason

July) Virginia, Fairfax Co., Falls Church Township, Series M593_1645 Part 1, Page 298B/299A, lines 36-40/1-5: James M. Mason (b. 1798 - 71 - in DC - Occ: Farmer - Property Value $9000 + $22000) married to Eliza (b. 1799 - 71 - in PA - Property Value $15000 + $5000). Children listed (born in VA) are: Virginia (dau b. 1834 - 36); and Eliza (dau b. 1837 - 33). Also listed are: Mary Agnes Bingle (b. 1849 - 21 - in Canada - Occ: Domestic Servant); Jane Patterson (b. 1838 - 32 - in Ireland - Occ: Seamstress); Hannah Someby (b. 1835 - 35 - in VA - Occ: Domestic Servant - BLACK); James Davis (b. 1856 - 14 - in VA - Occ: Domestic Servant - BLACK); James Dalglish (b. 1840 - 30 - in Scotland - Occ: Gardner); and Richard Sebastian (b. 1812 - 58 - in VA - Occ: Farm Hand)

!"The Winchester Star" Newspaper article Monday, January 11, 1999; "A Confederate in Her Majesty's Court" by J. Paul Sandefur (transcribed by Larry Weems):
It's a well-known fact that Winchester changed hands more than any other town during the Civil War.
What isn't as well known is that one of the principal players of the Confederacy, James Murray Mason - the Virginia senator who authored the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 that mandated the return of runaway slaves and outlawed assisting the fugitives in any way - lived in Winchester for 32 years.
A new biography of Mason, titled "Senator James Murray Mason" Defender of the Old South" details the Winchester resident's life. The first full-length biography of Mason, the book was written by Robert W. Young, a history professor at Carroll Community College in Westminster, Md. According to Young, Mason - grandson of Revolutionary legislator George Mason - moved to Winchester in 1820 to set up his law practice, having recently completed his study of law at the College of William and Mary. "The first few years in Winchester were difficult for a young man away from his family and struggling to establish a fledgling law practice," Young writes.
He married Eliza Chew of Philadelphia in 1822 and spent the next four years expanding his practice and starting a family. By 1826, the young Mason had established his practice and embarked on a political career. He was elected to represent Frederick County in Virginia House of Delegates.
In 1829, the Masons purchased Selma, a stone house just west of Winchester, where they lived for 32 years while James Murray Mason rose to national political prominence.
Young describes Mason as a tall, big-boned man with a receding hairline and bushy eyebrows.
Mason served in the House of Representatives for two years before being elected to the Senate in 1847. Three years after his election, Mason drafted the Fugitive Slave Act. Part of the Compromise of 1850 between Northern and Southern states that delayed the Civil War for about 10 years, the Fugitive Slave Act no doubt was based on Mason's belief that slavery was a vibrant, positive social system, according to Young.
Mason did not consider it "expedient or wise...to educate the Negro race at all, bond or free," and thought that freeing the slaves "would end...in their relapsing into utter and brutal barbarism," according to Young.
In short, Mason believed bondage was the best place for blacks, Young writes "Mason had a paternalistic relationship with the few slaves whom he owned, and he made the mistake of assuming that kindness and generosity were the norm for Southern slave owners."
Despite these beliefs, Young insists Mason didn't support secession simply to defend the institution of slavery.
Instead, Young writes that Mason viewed the changing North, with its rapid industrialization and call to free the slaves, as infringing on Virginia's constitutional right to govern its own affairs.
"Critics may accuse him of seeking to perpetuate a society built upon oppression. But within his own frame of reference, Mason fought for freedom just as much as his 18th century predecessors had," Young writes.
The Compromise of 1850 sought to ease tensions between North and South, particularly over the issue of slavery.
But the subject was again thrust into the national spotlight in 1859, when a band of Kansas abolitionists led by John Brown raided the U.S. Arsenal at Harpers Ferry, then part of Virginia.
Roused from his home by the news of the attack, Mason personally interrogated the sounded Brown at Harpers Ferry.
According to Young, Mason pressed Brown to name the insurrection's financial backers, convinced Northerners had assisted the Kansas abolitionist.
When Brown refused to identify anyone, Mason asked Brown how he justified killing innocent people.
"I think, my friend, you are guilty of a great wrong against God and humanity," Young quotes Brown as saying.
Following the incident, Mason chaired the Senate committee that investigated the uprising.
Thought it spent six months bringing witnesses before the Senate in an attempt to implicate others in the plot, the committee ended its probe with an anticlimactic report.
The report concluded Brown "did not even trust those closest to him with his plans," and therefore could not have been acting under the guidance of others.
Despite Mason's hopes, the hearings did not expose the grand Northern conspiracy that he suspected, a conclusion that frustrated the Virginian.
Although the excitement of the attack died down, the issue that prompted it did not, and just seven months after the committee submitted its report, South Carolina seceded from the Union.
Six other states followed South Carolina's lead during the next couple of weeks.
By the end of January 1861, the division of the Union was no longer speculation.
At least rhetorically, Mason supported efforts to reconcile the Union and the severed Southern states, though Young asserts Mason and Virginia were only biding their time before joining their Southern neighbors.
However, with President Abraham Lincoln's deployment of 75,000 federal troops in April of 1861 to counter the Confederate assault on the U. S. garrison at Fort Sumter in Charleston, S. C., Mason could no longer ride the fence on the issue, according to Young.
In Mason's words, "a war which could conquer a peace only in oceans of blood" was now unavoidable.
What happened next is what history remembers Mason for most.
Mason is most famous for his role in the Trent Affair, a naval incident that sparked international outrage and nearly ignited a war between the United States and Great Britain in 1861.
Mason and Louisiana Sen. John Slidell had been hand picked in the fall of 1861 by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to become European ambassadors for the Confederacy.
Slidell was to travel to Paris to represent Confederate interests to Napoleon III.
At the same time, Mason was sent to London to urge the British government to formally recognize the Confederacy as a legitimate government, a key element to the South's hopes for success.
Davis no doubt picked Mason in part because of Mason's service as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 1851 to 1861.
On their voyage to Europe, the ambassadors were taken from a British mail steamer, the Trent, by a U. S. naval vessel off the coast of Havana. The U. S. vessel was enforcing a Union blockade of Southern ports.
Upon learning the identity of the Confederate ambassadors, U. S. Navy Captain Charles Wilkes arrested the two Southerners, despite Mason's claim that they were under the protection of the flag of a neutral country.
Wilkes brought his prisoners to Boston, where they were imprisoned on Nov. 24, 1861, much to the delight of the Northerners, who saw their arrest as a stunning blow to the Southern independence.
Hoping for British retaliation, Davis lodged an official protest of his diplomats arrest, claiming the act not only violated Confederate rights but also affronted British authority because the men were seized from a British vessel.
London responded by demanding the immediate release of Mason and Slidell.
The British government also deployed an additional 8,000 soldiers to Canada to reinforce her majesty's troops in North America should diplomacy fail.
Faced with the unwanted prospect of war with Britain, Lincoln bowed to British pressure and released Mason and Slidell, who were placed on another steamer bound for Europe, according to Young.
The move was initially viewed as a diplomatic victory for the South. But Young asserts that Davis did not capitalize on swelling support for the Southern cause among British citizens.
Young characterizes Davis' foreign policy as passive, and the fuss over the crisis died down quicker than it had risen, leaving the South without any advantage.
"The Confederacy could have stood up as the independent nation it claimed to be," Young states.
Instead, it's leaders emerged from the incident empty-handed.
Following the Trent Affair, Mason spent the next four years trying unsuccessfully to persuade British officials to formally recognize the Confederate government.
A consummate diplomat, Mason spent a great deal of his time in the company of London's high society, where he was quite well received and where his cause had support, despite Britain's insistence on neutrality.
However, while Mason worked his delicate social magic on the lords and ladies of England, his wife and children remained at Selma for the first part of the war.
Life in Winchester became quite difficult.
According to a diary kept during the war by his Winchester neighbor, Cornelia McDonald, families accustomed to stocked smokehouses and root cellars were suddenly forced to scrounge for any food they could find.
Eliza Mason and her daughters were forced to abandon Selma in March 1862 when Northern troops prepared to capture Winchester. They retreated to Richmond, the capital city of the Confederacy.
Union troops occupied Selma that month, demolishing it "little by little over the nest ten months. The federal soldiers began by chipping off pieces of it to send north as sourvenirs," Young writes.
By January 1863, the roof had been removed and the walls were pulled down and burned for firewood. Stones from the house were used to build Union fortifications, according to Young.
When news of the demolition reached London, Mason vowed never to return to Winchester.
A year after the Confederate surrender at Appomattox in 1865, Mason joined his family in Canada, where they lived as expatriates until 1869.
Mason returned to Virginia in 1869 to find a suitable home in which to relocate his family to his beloved state.
According to his daughter, Virginia Mason, the 71-year-old Southern gentleman left Canada in the early summer of 1869, making his way south to Virginia.
He visited many friends along the way, which raised his spirits, according to his daughter.
During his trip, he purchased a house in Fairfax Co., where he could bring his family and live out his days in comfort.
But a bitter note resonated throughout his travel.
While in Virginia, Mason returned to Winchester, where they havoc of war inflicted on his hometown grieved him greatly.
Many of the homes he once visited and friends he knew before the war were gone.
"When he returned to Canada his family were shocked...by the change wrought in him during the few weeks of his absence," his daughter wrote. "He came back an old man."
During the next several months, Mason's health declined, as if the burden of the struggle he thought would free his beloved state came crashing down upon him.
Young writes that Mason never recovered from the sorrow he felt at seeing Winchester so changed from how he remembered it.
Mason died on April 28, 1871, "six years after the South's military defeat completed the destruction of the world he spent his life defending."

(Editor's Note: The property on which Mason's house stood was sold after the war.
According to Garland R. Quarles, the new Selma, located at 514 Amherst St., was built on the same property in the early 1870's by Judge Edmund Pendleton, who had purchased the property from Robert Steel in 1872.
Selma is now a private residence owned by the Charles H. and Lucile W. Dick family, who are not connected to the Mason family.)

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MASON, James Murray (I500060)
 
7


Notes for James Murray Mason

July) Virginia, Fairfax Co., Falls Church Township, Series M593_1645 Part 1, Page 298B/299A, lines 36-40/1-5: James M. Mason (b. 1798 - 71 - in DC - Occ: Farmer - Property Value $9000 + $22000) married to Eliza (b. 1799 - 71 - in PA - Property Value $15000 + $5000). Children listed (born in VA) are: Virginia (dau b. 1834 - 36); and Eliza (dau b. 1837 - 33). Also listed are: Mary Agnes Bingle (b. 1849 - 21 - in Canada - Occ: Domestic Servant); Jane Patterson (b. 1838 - 32 - in Ireland - Occ: Seamstress); Hannah Someby (b. 1835 - 35 - in VA - Occ: Domestic Servant - BLACK); James Davis (b. 1856 - 14 - in VA - Occ: Domestic Servant - BLACK); James Dalglish (b. 1840 - 30 - in Scotland - Occ: Gardner); and Richard Sebastian (b. 1812 - 58 - in VA - Occ: Farm Hand)

!"The Winchester Star" Newspaper article Monday, January 11, 1999; "A Confederate in Her Majesty's Court" by J. Paul Sandefur (transcribed by Larry Weems):
It's a well-known fact that Winchester changed hands more than any other town during the Civil War.
What isn't as well known is that one of the principal players of the Confederacy, James Murray Mason - the Virginia senator who authored the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 that mandated the return of runaway slaves and outlawed assisting the fugitives in any way - lived in Winchester for 32 years.
A new biography of Mason, titled "Senator James Murray Mason" Defender of the Old South" details the Winchester resident's life. The first full-length biography of Mason, the book was written by Robert W. Young, a history professor at Carroll Community College in Westminster, Md. According to Young, Mason - grandson of Revolutionary legislator George Mason - moved to Winchester in 1820 to set up his law practice, having recently completed his study of law at the College of William and Mary. "The first few years in Winchester were difficult for a young man away from his family and struggling to establish a fledgling law practice," Young writes.
He married Eliza Chew of Philadelphia in 1822 and spent the next four years expanding his practice and starting a family. By 1826, the young Mason had established his practice and embarked on a political career. He was elected to represent Frederick County in Virginia House of Delegates.
In 1829, the Masons purchased Selma, a stone house just west of Winchester, where they lived for 32 years while James Murray Mason rose to national political prominence.
Young describes Mason as a tall, big-boned man with a receding hairline and bushy eyebrows.
Mason served in the House of Representatives for two years before being elected to the Senate in 1847. Three years after his election, Mason drafted the Fugitive Slave Act. Part of the Compromise of 1850 between Northern and Southern states that delayed the Civil War for about 10 years, the Fugitive Slave Act no doubt was based on Mason's belief that slavery was a vibrant, positive social system, according to Young.
Mason did not consider it "expedient or wise...to educate the Negro race at all, bond or free," and thought that freeing the slaves "would end...in their relapsing into utter and brutal barbarism," according to Young.
In short, Mason believed bondage was the best place for blacks, Young writes "Mason had a paternalistic relationship with the few slaves whom he owned, and he made the mistake of assuming that kindness and generosity were the norm for Southern slave owners."
Despite these beliefs, Young insists Mason didn't support secession simply to defend the institution of slavery.
Instead, Young writes that Mason viewed the changing North, with its rapid industrialization and call to free the slaves, as infringing on Virginia's constitutional right to govern its own affairs.
"Critics may accuse him of seeking to perpetuate a society built upon oppression. But within his own frame of reference, Mason fought for freedom just as much as his 18th century predecessors had," Young writes.
The Compromise of 1850 sought to ease tensions between North and South, particularly over the issue of slavery.
But the subject was again thrust into the national spotlight in 1859, when a band of Kansas abolitionists led by John Brown raided the U.S. Arsenal at Harpers Ferry, then part of Virginia.
Roused from his home by the news of the attack, Mason personally interrogated the sounded Brown at Harpers Ferry.
According to Young, Mason pressed Brown to name the insurrection's financial backers, convinced Northerners had assisted the Kansas abolitionist.
When Brown refused to identify anyone, Mason asked Brown how he justified killing innocent people.
"I think, my friend, you are guilty of a great wrong against God and humanity," Young quotes Brown as saying.
Following the incident, Mason chaired the Senate committee that investigated the uprising.
Thought it spent six months bringing witnesses before the Senate in an attempt to implicate others in the plot, the committee ended its probe with an anticlimactic report.
The report concluded Brown "did not even trust those closest to him with his plans," and therefore could not have been acting under the guidance of others.
Despite Mason's hopes, the hearings did not expose the grand Northern conspiracy that he suspected, a conclusion that frustrated the Virginian.
Although the excitement of the attack died down, the issue that prompted it did not, and just seven months after the committee submitted its report, South Carolina seceded from the Union.
Six other states followed South Carolina's lead during the next couple of weeks.
By the end of January 1861, the division of the Union was no longer speculation.
At least rhetorically, Mason supported efforts to reconcile the Union and the severed Southern states, though Young asserts Mason and Virginia were only biding their time before joining their Southern neighbors.
However, with President Abraham Lincoln's deployment of 75,000 federal troops in April of 1861 to counter the Confederate assault on the U. S. garrison at Fort Sumter in Charleston, S. C., Mason could no longer ride the fence on the issue, according to Young.
In Mason's words, "a war which could conquer a peace only in oceans of blood" was now unavoidable.
What happened next is what history remembers Mason for most.
Mason is most famous for his role in the Trent Affair, a naval incident that sparked international outrage and nearly ignited a war between the United States and Great Britain in 1861.
Mason and Louisiana Sen. John Slidell had been hand picked in the fall of 1861 by Confederate President Jefferson Davis to become European ambassadors for the Confederacy.
Slidell was to travel to Paris to represent Confederate interests to Napoleon III.
At the same time, Mason was sent to London to urge the British government to formally recognize the Confederacy as a legitimate government, a key element to the South's hopes for success.
Davis no doubt picked Mason in part because of Mason's service as chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 1851 to 1861.
On their voyage to Europe, the ambassadors were taken from a British mail steamer, the Trent, by a U. S. naval vessel off the coast of Havana. The U. S. vessel was enforcing a Union blockade of Southern ports.
Upon learning the identity of the Confederate ambassadors, U. S. Navy Captain Charles Wilkes arrested the two Southerners, despite Mason's claim that they were under the protection of the flag of a neutral country.
Wilkes brought his prisoners to Boston, where they were imprisoned on Nov. 24, 1861, much to the delight of the Northerners, who saw their arrest as a stunning blow to the Southern independence.
Hoping for British retaliation, Davis lodged an official protest of his diplomats arrest, claiming the act not only violated Confederate rights but also affronted British authority because the men were seized from a British vessel.
London responded by demanding the immediate release of Mason and Slidell.
The British government also deployed an additional 8,000 soldiers to Canada to reinforce her majesty's troops in North America should diplomacy fail.
Faced with the unwanted prospect of war with Britain, Lincoln bowed to British pressure and released Mason and Slidell, who were placed on another steamer bound for Europe, according to Young.
The move was initially viewed as a diplomatic victory for the South. But Young asserts that Davis did not capitalize on swelling support for the Southern cause among British citizens.
Young characterizes Davis' foreign policy as passive, and the fuss over the crisis died down quicker than it had risen, leaving the South without any advantage.
"The Confederacy could have stood up as the independent nation it claimed to be," Young states.
Instead, it's leaders emerged from the incident empty-handed.
Following the Trent Affair, Mason spent the next four years trying unsuccessfully to persuade British officials to formally recognize the Confederate government.
A consummate diplomat, Mason spent a great deal of his time in the company of London's high society, where he was quite well received and where his cause had support, despite Britain's insistence on neutrality.
However, while Mason worked his delicate social magic on the lords and ladies of England, his wife and children remained at Selma for the first part of the war.
Life in Winchester became quite difficult.
According to a diary kept during the war by his Winchester neighbor, Cornelia McDonald, families accustomed to stocked smokehouses and root cellars were suddenly forced to scrounge for any food they could find.
Eliza Mason and her daughters were forced to abandon Selma in March 1862 when Northern troops prepared to capture Winchester. They retreated to Richmond, the capital city of the Confederacy.
Union troops occupied Selma that month, demolishing it "little by little over the nest ten months. The federal soldiers began by chipping off pieces of it to send north as sourvenirs," Young writes.
By January 1863, the roof had been removed and the walls were pulled down and burned for firewood. Stones from the house were used to build Union fortifications, according to Young.
When news of the demolition reached London, Mason vowed never to return to Winchester.
A year after the Confederate surrender at Appomattox in 1865, Mason joined his family in Canada, where they lived as expatriates until 1869.
Mason returned to Virginia in 1869 to find a suitable home in which to relocate his family to his beloved state.
According to his daughter, Virginia Mason, the 71-year-old Southern gentleman left Canada in the early summer of 1869, making his way south to Virginia.
He visited many friends along the way, which raised his spirits, according to his daughter.
During his trip, he purchased a house in Fairfax Co., where he could bring his family and live out his days in comfort.
But a bitter note resonated throughout his travel.
While in Virginia, Mason returned to Winchester, where they havoc of war inflicted on his hometown grieved him greatly.
Many of the homes he once visited and friends he knew before the war were gone.
"When he returned to Canada his family were shocked...by the change wrought in him during the few weeks of his absence," his daughter wrote. "He came back an old man."
During the next several months, Mason's health declined, as if the burden of the struggle he thought would free his beloved state came crashing down upon him.
Young writes that Mason never recovered from the sorrow he felt at seeing Winchester so changed from how he remembered it.
Mason died on April 28, 1871, "six years after the South's military defeat completed the destruction of the world he spent his life defending."

(Editor's Note: The property on which Mason's house stood was sold after the war.
According to Garland R. Quarles, the new Selma, located at 514 Amherst St., was built on the same property in the early 1870's by Judge Edmund Pendleton, who had purchased the property from Robert Steel in 1872.
Selma is now a private residence owned by the Charles H. and Lucile W. Dick family, who are not connected to the Mason family.)

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Mason, James Murray (I1000252)
 
8

Oldest son George fought with Royalists against Cromwell, commanded troop of horses in Royal Army at Battle of Worcester; fled to Virginia on the Good Ship Assurance with youngest brother, William., Cavalier/Soldier

 
MASON, Thomas (I500087)
 
9

Oldest son George fought with Royalists against Cromwell, commanded troop of horses in Royal Army at Battle of Worcester; fled to Virginia on the Good Ship Assurance with youngest brother, William., Cavalier/Soldier

 
Mason, Thomas (I1000279)
 
10

"Hon. Matthew Page was one of the members of the original Board of Trustees for the College of William and Mary, and his name appears in the charter of that INstitution as "Matthew Page, Gent." http://www.palmspringsbum.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I116906&tree=Legends

 
PAGE, Mathew (I500128)
 
11

"Hon. Matthew Page was one of the members of the original Board of Trustees for the College of William and Mary, and his name appears in the charter of that INstitution as "Matthew Page, Gent." http://www.palmspringsbum.org/genealogy/getperson.php?personID=I116906&tree=Legends

 
Page, Mathew (I1000320)
 
12

!Maryland Genealogies...from Maryland Historical Magazine 975.2 M369 V.1: p256; He moved from Virginia to Maryland before 1659 and took up his abode in Anne Arundel County. He entered his rights, 16 July 1659, for transporting himself, Robert Crouch, Thomas Madders and Hannah Rogers, and received a warrant for 400 acres (Md. Land Office, Liber 4, folio 54).
He was a Colonel and lived at Maidstone, a land grant in Anne Arundel Co. He also owned Sanetly, a tract of land adjoining Maidstone, but lying in Calvert County. Maidstone is marked by an old house which still stands just below the northern boundary of Calvert County. It was built by Col. Samuel Chew or his son Samuel. In 1660-1718, Samuel Chew, Jr. acquired the tract called Popinjay. He represented Anne Arundel Co. in the Maryland Assembly in 1661 (Md. Arch., I. 396), was High Sheriff of the county in 1663 (ibid., III.481), and was one of its justices in 1665 and 1668 (ibid., III.534; V.30). He was commissioned, 23 July 1669, a member of the Council of Maryland and a justice of the Provincial Court (ibid., V.54), and retained his seat in the council until his death (Liber M.D., folio 427; Md. Arch., II.254, 377, 433; XV.23, 75, 109, et seq.) In 1675 he was a Colonel of the militia of Anne Arundel County (Md. Arch., XV.59) and in this capacity was ordered to raise forces for defense against the Indians (ibid., 47). He was also a member of the Council of War which convened 20 July 1676. He died, according to his family record, on the 15th of March 1676/7 (old style), leaving, among other bequests, "his seale gold ring" to his brother Joseph Chew.

 
CHEW, John (I500072)
 
13

!Maryland Genealogies...from Maryland Historical Magazine 975.2 M369 V.1: p256; He moved from Virginia to Maryland before 1659 and took up his abode in Anne Arundel County. He entered his rights, 16 July 1659, for transporting himself, Robert Crouch, Thomas Madders and Hannah Rogers, and received a warrant for 400 acres (Md. Land Office, Liber 4, folio 54).
He was a Colonel and lived at Maidstone, a land grant in Anne Arundel Co. He also owned Sanetly, a tract of land adjoining Maidstone, but lying in Calvert County. Maidstone is marked by an old house which still stands just below the northern boundary of Calvert County. It was built by Col. Samuel Chew or his son Samuel. In 1660-1718, Samuel Chew, Jr. acquired the tract called Popinjay. He represented Anne Arundel Co. in the Maryland Assembly in 1661 (Md. Arch., I. 396), was High Sheriff of the county in 1663 (ibid., III.481), and was one of its justices in 1665 and 1668 (ibid., III.534; V.30). He was commissioned, 23 July 1669, a member of the Council of Maryland and a justice of the Provincial Court (ibid., V.54), and retained his seat in the council until his death (Liber M.D., folio 427; Md. Arch., II.254, 377, 433; XV.23, 75, 109, et seq.) In 1675 he was a Colonel of the militia of Anne Arundel County (Md. Arch., XV.59) and in this capacity was ordered to raise forces for defense against the Indians (ibid., 47). He was also a member of the Council of War which convened 20 July 1676. He died, according to his family record, on the 15th of March 1676/7 (old style), leaving, among other bequests, "his seale gold ring" to his brother Joseph Chew.

 
Chew, John (I1000264)
 
14

He studied law at Philadelphia, went abroad in 1741, and entered Middle Temple, Inns of Court, London. He returned to America after his father's death. He was admitted to the bar in 1746 and began practice at Dover, Delaware (formerly under the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania). Move to Philadelphia in 1754 and built his country seat, "Cliveden," on the Germantown road in 1761.
He was a Commissioner of Boundaries for the three lower counties of Delaware in 1751; Speaker of the House from the same district in 1753-1758; Attorney General of Pennsylvania and member of the Provincial Council 1754-1769;
Register of General Wills 1765-1776; Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania 1774-1776; Judge and President of the High Court of Errors and Appeals 1791-1806 (Pa. Archives: Pa. Hist. Society Publications: Keith's "Provincial Councillors of Pennsylvania").

!New Century Cyclopedia of Names; Volume I p. 932; Edited by Clarence L. Barnhart, 1954: "After the war, Washington befriended him and attended the wedding dinner of Peggy Chew at "Cliveden", the Chew mansion at Germantown, Pa., on May 23, 1787."

!Marriage Data: From the Maryland Gazette, pg 31...16 June 1747: Mary was the daughter of John Galloway. Married on Sat. 13 Jun 1747.

!Web Site - http://www.cliveden.org/ - Cliveden was built as a summer home for Benjamin and Elizabeth Chew, Cliveden was completed in 1767 after four years of labor on a six-acre estate, in the heart of one of Philadelphia's oldest neighborhoods. The house is a classic example of the Georgian style, adapted to make the best of local materials and craftsmen. The have arrangements for weddings on the ground in the Carriage house...up to 80 people inside and 450 out doors - CLIVEDEN 6401 Germantown Avenue; Philadelphia, PA 19144 Phone: 215-848-1797 ($900 in 1998)

 
CHEW, Benjamin (I500064)
 
15

He studied law at Philadelphia, went abroad in 1741, and entered Middle Temple, Inns of Court, London. He returned to America after his father's death. He was admitted to the bar in 1746 and began practice at Dover, Delaware (formerly under the jurisdiction of Pennsylvania). Move to Philadelphia in 1754 and built his country seat, "Cliveden," on the Germantown road in 1761.
He was a Commissioner of Boundaries for the three lower counties of Delaware in 1751; Speaker of the House from the same district in 1753-1758; Attorney General of Pennsylvania and member of the Provincial Council 1754-1769;
Register of General Wills 1765-1776; Chief Justice of the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania 1774-1776; Judge and President of the High Court of Errors and Appeals 1791-1806 (Pa. Archives: Pa. Hist. Society Publications: Keith's "Provincial Councillors of Pennsylvania").

!New Century Cyclopedia of Names; Volume I p. 932; Edited by Clarence L. Barnhart, 1954: "After the war, Washington befriended him and attended the wedding dinner of Peggy Chew at "Cliveden", the Chew mansion at Germantown, Pa., on May 23, 1787."

!Marriage Data: From the Maryland Gazette, pg 31...16 June 1747: Mary was the daughter of John Galloway. Married on Sat. 13 Jun 1747.

!Web Site - http://www.cliveden.org/ - Cliveden was built as a summer home for Benjamin and Elizabeth Chew, Cliveden was completed in 1767 after four years of labor on a six-acre estate, in the heart of one of Philadelphia's oldest neighborhoods. The house is a classic example of the Georgian style, adapted to make the best of local materials and craftsmen. The have arrangements for weddings on the ground in the Carriage house...up to 80 people inside and 450 out doors - CLIVEDEN 6401 Germantown Avenue; Philadelphia, PA 19144 Phone: 215-848-1797 ($900 in 1998)

 
Chew, Benjamin (I1000256)
 
16

Lecturer on behalf of the National Committee for Better Films.

 
Speed, Phillip (I500191)
 
17

Lecturer on behalf of the National Committee for Better Films.

 
Speed, Phillip (I1000383)
 
18

Gave the ground for the church and the graveyard. His eldest son, Francis, enlarged the church, Bruton Parish 



Emigrated to America 1650

Member of House of Burgesses and Council of the Virginia Colony 
Page Francis, Col. John (I1000322)
 
19

Gave the ground for the church and the graveyard. His eldest son, Francis, enlarged the church, Bruton Parish 


Came to America in 1650
Member of House of Burgesses and Council of the Virginia Colony 
Page, Col. John Francis (I500130)
 
20

https://books.google.com/books?id=eyik0rO0HlsC&pg=PA54&lpg=PA54&dq=John+and+Grace+Stegg+Byrd,+London&source=bl&ots=RBsLRazJ3M&sig=I2gosMAsth-uR6tY8FND6dV5WfI&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwikmt3N3p7SAhUGOyYKHdR3AJ0Q6AEIPjAI#v=onepage&q=John%20and%20Grace%20Stegg%20Byrd%2C%20London&f=false

g>!

x; line-height: 1.42857143; word-break: break-all; word-wrap: break-word; color: #333333; background-color: #f5f5f5; border: 1px solid #cccccc; border-top-left-radius: 4px; border-top-right-radius: 4px; border-bottom-right-radius: 4px; border-bottom-left-radius: 4px;">JOHN DE LACIE, a Magna Charta Surety, had : Earl of Hertford and Gloucester, d, 1295, who had : ., Baron Spencer, d, 1375, who had : g>, m. Edward Neville, K.G., d. 1476, and had : . Leger, of Ulcombe, and had : , Essex, who had :  
HORSMANDEN, Mary (Maria) (I500135)
 
21

https://books.google.com/books?id=eyik0rO0HlsC&pg=PA54&lpg=PA54&dq=John+and+Grace+Stegg+Byrd,+London&source=bl&ots=RBsLRazJ3M&sig=I2gosMAsth-uR6tY8FND6dV5WfI&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwikmt3N3p7SAhUGOyYKHdR3AJ0Q6AEIPjAI#v=onepage&q=John%20and%20Grace%20Stegg%20Byrd%2C%20London&f=false

g>!

x; line-height: 1.42857143; word-break: break-all; word-wrap: break-word; color: #333333; background-color: #f5f5f5; border: 1px solid #cccccc; border-top-left-radius: 4px; border-top-right-radius: 4px; border-bottom-right-radius: 4px; border-bottom-left-radius: 4px;">JOHN DE LACIE, a Magna Charta Surety, had : Earl of Hertford and Gloucester, d, 1295, who had : ., Baron Spencer, d, 1375, who had : g>, m. Edward Neville, K.G., d. 1476, and had : . Leger, of Ulcombe, and had : , Essex, who had :  
Horsmanden, Mary (Maria) (I1000327)
 
22
    //www.palmspringsbum.org/genealogy/css/Paper7.gif'); font-size: 11pt; line-height: normal; font-family: sylfaen, 'trebuchet ms';">The Virginia history of the Byrd family began in 1670 with the emigration from England of the young eighteen-year-old William Byrd, son of John and Grace (Stegg) Byrd of London. Thomas Stegg, his maternal uncle, had become a prominent man in Virginia some years before ...

    Stegg was possessed of considerable property but had no children, and in 1670 he induced his nephew to come to Virginia and become his heir - a step none too soon, for he died in the same year, and the future Col. William Byrd found himself one of the landed gentry of the colony.

    He settle on his uncle's lands on the present site of the city of Richmond and continued the planting operations and Indian trade begun by his uncle. 
BYRD, John (I500136)
 
23
    //www.palmspringsbum.org/genealogy/css/Paper7.gif'); font-size: 11pt; line-height: normal; font-family: sylfaen, 'trebuchet ms';">The Virginia history of the Byrd family began in 1670 with the emigration from England of the young eighteen-year-old William Byrd, son of John and Grace (Stegg) Byrd of London. Thomas Stegg, his maternal uncle, had become a prominent man in Virginia some years before ...

    Stegg was possessed of considerable property but had no children, and in 1670 he induced his nephew to come to Virginia and become his heir - a step none too soon, for he died in the same year, and the future Col. William Byrd found himself one of the landed gentry of the colony.

    He settle on his uncle's lands on the present site of the city of Richmond and continued the planting operations and Indian trade begun by his uncle. 
Byrd, John (I1000328)
 
24 About Anna Mason's parents. Anna was from Annapolis, Maryland. Her father was Dr James Murray. His house still stands and is an inn.
Her mother was Sarah Ennals Maynadier Nevett Murray. She was from the Eastern Shore of Maryland. Her first husband, a Nevett, died of accidental drowning.
Sarah Nevett married James Murray second and moved to Annapolis. Anna Mason had an older half sister, Mary Nevett Steele, as well as many other siblings. Her mother had over 50 grandchildren. Anna's grand parents, mother, and many other relatives are all buried St John's Episcopal Cemetery in Annapolis.

from https://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=43974884
 
Murray, Anna Maria (I1000271)
 
25 Born at North End, Gloucester (Now Matthews County). Removed to Willis' Fork, Cumberland Co., Va. He married, first in 1783, Mary Cary, and secondly, in 1799, Lucy Nelson, daughter of Governor Thomas Nelson and Lucy Grymes Nelson of Yorktown, Va. He was Aide de Camp to General Lafayette during the Revolution as a Captain in the Cavalry. PAGE, Major Carter (I500118)
 
26 Francis Doughty was in Taunton, MA in 1639, removed in 1641 to Long Island and was not treated well for a minister of the gospel.

[S239] NE Dictionary, Savage, James, (Genealogical Publishing Co., Inc., Baltimore, MD, 1860-1862), v II, p 62, Enoch is not listed as a son, but it is supposed the family moved from the area, maybe to CT?. 
Doughty, Francis Jr. (I87)
 
27 Hon. John Page and Jane Byrd, his wife, married in 1746, had fifteen children in all, four of whom died infants, their names being unknown. The eleven that survived were as follows:
1. Mann Page, eldest, born at North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) Co., Va., about 1747; removed to Fairfield. Clarke Co.. Va. He married, about 1767, Mary Mason Selden, of Salvington. Stafford Co., Va.
2. John Page, born at North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) Co., Va.,about 1749; removed to Caroline County, Va. He married, in 1764, Elizabeth (called Betty) Burwell.
3. Jane Page, born about 1751; married, about 1770, Dr. Nathaniel Nelson, second son and child of President William Nelson, of Yorktown, Va.
4. Dr. William Page, born at North End, about 1753; removed to Richmond, Va. He married, about 1778, Miss Jones.
5. Judith Page, born about 1755, married, about 1775, Col. Hugh Nelson, third son and child of President William Nelson, of Yorktown, Va.
6. Carter Page, born at North End, 1758; removed to Willis" Fork, Cumberland Co., Va. He married, first, in 1783, Mary Cary, and secondly, in 1799, Lucy, eighth child and third daughter of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Va.
7. Robert Page, born in 1764; removed to Janeville, Clarke Co., Va. He married, in 1788. Sarah Page, of Broadneck, Hanover Co., Va. As four other children had died infants—names unknown—when Robert was born he was really the eleventh child, although the seventh survivor.
8. Maria (called Molly) Page, born about 1765; married, first, John Byrd ; secondly, Archie Boiling; and thirdly, Peter Randolph ; by none of whom had she any issue.
9. Matthew Page, born about 1767; died unmarried.
10. Thomas Page, born about 1773; married, about 1798, Mildred, daughter of Edmund Pendleton, father of Edmund Pendleton, who married Jane B. Page, daughter of the above-named John Page (No. 2) and Elizabeth Burwell, his wife. Of the children of Thomas Page and Mildred Pendleton, his wife, Mildred Page married Palmer. There were also Thomas, Henry, and Robert, of whom nothing at present is known.
11. Lucy Page, youngest, born about 1775; married, about 1792. Francis Nelson, of Mont Air, Hanover Co., Va., fourth son and child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Va.


Family links:
Parents:
William Byrd (1674 - 1744)
Maria Taylor Byrd (1698 - 1771)

Spouse:
John Williamson Page (1724 - 1774)

Children:
Judith Page Nelson (1753 - 1827)*
Carter Page (1758 - 1825)*

Siblings:
Evelyn Byrd (1707 - 1737)**
Parke Byrd (1709 - 1710)**
Philip William Byrd (1712 - 1712)**
Wilhelmina Byrd Chamberlayne (1715 - 1760)**
Anne Byrd Carter (1725 - 1775)*
Maria Horsmanden Byrd Carter (1727 - 1744)*
William Evelyn Byrd (1728 - 1777)*
Jane Byrd Page (1729 - 1774)

*Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling

Burial:
North End Cemetery
Mathews
Mathews County
Virginia, USA

Created by: RF
Record added: Apr 18, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 51309242
 
BYRD, Jane (I500120)
 
28 Inscription:
HERE LYETH BVRIED YE BODY OF JOHN CARTER ESQ WHO DIED YE 10TH DAY OF JAN ANNO DOMINI 1669 & ALSO JANE YE DAVGHTER OF MR MORGAN GLYN & GEORGE HER SON & ELINOR CARTER
& ANN YE DAVGHTER OF MR CLEAVE CARTER & SARAH Y DAVGHTER OF MR GABVIL LADLOWE & SARAH HER DAVGHTER WHICH WARE ALL HIS WIFES SVCKSESSIVELY & DYED BEFORE HIM.
BLESSED ARE YE DEAD WHICH DIE IN YE LORD EVEN SOE SAITH YE SPIRIT FOR THEY REST FROM THERE LABOVRS & THERE WORKS DOTH FOLLOW THEM.

Burial:
Christ Church Cemetery
Weems
Lancaster County
Virginia, USA

Maintained by: Anne Critcher Clark
Originally Created by: Faith
Record added: Jul 21, 2008
Find A Grave Memorial# 28427078
 
Carter, John (I103)
 
29 Inscription:
Loc: W 6 5 2 4 0 Alcoholism USA 
PAGE, Wood Newton (I500005)
 
30 John Page died "On Saturday morning last" at Mansfield near Fredericksburg, Virginia at the home of Mann Page. [Source: Virginia Gazette, Pickney. October 6, 1774. p. 3 col. 2]

According to Governor Page's letter, extracts from which may be seen in Bishop Meade, op. at., Vol. I., p. 147, note, he was educated a lawyer, and was a member of the Colonial Council, in place of his elder brother, Mann Page, of Rosewell. In this capacity we find the name of Hon. John Page, of North End, in the Virginia Almanac for 1776. He was, therefore, among the last of the Colonial Councillors.
Genealogy of the Page family in Virginia: By Richard Channing Moore Page

Hon. John Page and Jane Byrd, his wife, married in 1746, had fifteen children in all, four of whom died infants, their names being unknown. The eleven that survived were as follows:
1. Mann Page, eldest, born at North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) Co., Va., about 1747; removed to Fairfield. Clarke Co.. Va. He married, about 1767, Mary Mason Selden, of Salvington. Stafford Co., Va.
2. John Page, born at North End, Gloucester (now Matthews) Co., Va.,about 1749; removed to Caroline County, Va. He married, in 1764, Elizabeth (called Betty) Burwell.
3. Jane Page, born about 1751; married, about 1770, Dr. Nathaniel Nelson, second son and child of President William Nelson, of Yorktown, Va.
4. Dr. William Page, born at North End, about 1753; removed to Richmond, Va. He married, about 1778, Miss Jones.
5. Judith Page, born about 1755, married, about 1775, Col. Hugh Nelson, third son and child of President William Nelson, of Yorktown, Va.
6. Carter Page, born at North End, 1758; removed to Willis" Fork, Cumberland Co., Va. He married, first, in 1783, Mary Cary, and secondly, in 1799, Lucy, eighth child and third daughter of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Va.
7. Robert Page, born in 1764; removed to Janeville, Clarke Co., Va. He married, in 1788. Sarah Page, of Broadneck, Hanover Co., Va. As four other children had died infants—names unknown—when Robert was born he was really the eleventh child, although the seventh survivor.
8. Maria (called Molly) Page, born about 1765; married, first, John Byrd ; secondly, Archie Boiling; and thirdly, Peter Randolph ; by none of whom had she any issue.
9. Matthew Page, born about 1767; died unmarried.
10. Thomas Page, born about 1773; married, about 1798, Mildred, daughter of Edmund Pendleton, father of Edmund Pendleton, who married Jane B. Page, daughter of the above-named John Page (No. 2) and Elizabeth Burwell, his wife. Of the children of Thomas Page and Mildred Pendleton, his wife, Mildred Page married Palmer. There were also Thomas, Henry, and Robert, of whom nothing at present is known.
11. Lucy Page, youngest, born about 1775; married, about 1792. Francis Nelson, of Mont Air, Hanover Co., Va., fourth son and child of Gov. Thomas Nelson, of Yorktown, Va.


Family links:
Parents:
Mann Page (1691 - 1730)
Judith Carter Page (1695 - 1750)

Spouse:
Jane Byrd Page (1729 - 1774)*

Children:
Judith Page Nelson (1753 - 1827)*
Carter Page (1758 - 1825)*

Siblings:
Maria Judith Page Randolph**
Robert Page (1722 - 1768)*
John Williamson Page (1724 - 1774)

*Calculated relationship
**Half-sibling

Burial:
North End Cemetery
Mathews
Mathews County
Virginia, USA

Created by: RF
Record added: Apr 18, 2010
Find A Grave Memorial# 51309356
 
PAGE, John Williamson (I500119)
 
31 Lucy is the 8th child and 3rd daughter of Thomas Nelson and Lucy Grymes Nelson of Yorktown, Va.

She married in 1799 to Major Carter Page, his second marriage. After the death of her husband, in 1825, she became entitled to, and received, a pension from the US Government, in consideration of his services as a soldier and an officer duriing the Revolutionary war. She was buried beside her husband at The Fork. The children were as follows:

1. Thomas Nelson Page born Oct 26, 1800 and Nov 2, 1800.

2. Nelson Page - born Nov 8, 1802 at The Fork, died there in Dec 6, 1850, aged 49. He married Lucia Harrison in Mar 1828 and had two children, May Randolph Page (called Polly) and Lucius Cary Page. He next married Maria Hamilton with no issue.

3. William Nelson Page - born Feb 28, 1803 at The Fork. He married Frances (Fannie) Peyton Randolph in 1827 and had issue: Dr. Isham Randolph Page, Anne Randolph Page, Philip Nelson Page, William Nelson Page (d-Jul 21, 1861, 20 yrs), Rev. Coupland Randolph Page, Lucia Harrion Page, and Fannie Randolph Page.

4. Lucy Jane Page, born Apr 6, 1804 at The Fork and died on Jan 7, 1872. She married in 1827, Jonathan Peter Cushing of Massachusetts, who became President of Hampden Sydney College, Va. Their children were: Lucy Cushing Irving(b Jul 8, 1855 - 25 yrs), Elizabeth (Bettie) Hanson Cushing Meredith (Sep 14, 1831 - Jan 17, 1865), Catherine Thornton Cushing.

5. Robert Burwell Page - born Apr 20, 1806 at The Fork and died in Sept 1837. He married in Nov 1829, Sarah H. May of Buckingham County, Va and children were: Carter Page, Mary May Page, and Lucy Nelson Page.

6. Thomas Page - born on Jun 6, 1807 at The Folk. He moved to Locust Grove, Cumberland Co.. He married on Nov 5, 1839 to Sally Page of Clark Co., Va.

7. Mary Maria (Page) Dame - (see children link below)
----------------------------------------------------
Pension Application of Lucy Page, the widow of Carter Page of Virginia: W2161 f48VA
Transcribed and Annotated by S. T. Landuyt 12/7/2011

[p. 3]
State of Virginia, Cumberland County to Wit
On this 11th day of June 1849, before me Nelson Page a Justice of the peace, in and for said County, personally appeared Mrs. Lucy Page a resident of said County aged 72 years who being first duly sworn according to law doth on her oath make the following declaration in order to obtain the benefit of the provision made by the Act of Congress passed on the 29th of July 1848, granting pensions to widows of those officers and Soldiers of the Revolutionary war, who were married prior to the first day of January 1800, and subsequent to the first day of January 1794:
That she is the widow of Carter Page dec'd of said County, who was a Lieutenant and Captain in the Continental lines of Service, and the Malitia [sic], the evidence of which service may be found on file in the Executive department of the State in Richmond, on which he obtained his 4,000 Acres of land, and also on file among his papers submitted to Congress during the 1st session of the 24 Congress, and to which the Com'r of pensions is also respectfully referred, as further proof of her dec'd husbands service. That personally she has no knowledge of her husbands service but from what she can recollect she is of the opinion that he was under Gen'l Thos. Nelsons Command and acted as his aid at one time, but, how long she can not say [note: Lucy Page, maiden name Lucy Nelson, is a daughter of General Thomas Nelson] – that he must have been in the service at the North for he spoke of the Battles of German Town [Germantown October 4, 1777], Brandy Wine [Brandywine, September 11, 1777], Princeton [January 3, 1777] &c and the extreme suffering of the soldiers for the want of provisions, shoes, Blankets &c – and the he was also at the Battle of Yorktown, and capture of Lord Cornwallis [October 19, 1781]and also at Guilford Court-House battle [March 15, 1781] – and she is not certain but thinks he was under Col Bayler [Col. George Baylor of the Virginia Dragoons] at one time; and in other service which she can not designate – but that he was only about 20 years old when he entered the service and continued after the capture of Cornwallis – and perhaps connected with the service as a supernumerary' or otherwise until the close of the Revolutionary War. That she was married to her dec'd husband Carter Page, in Yorktown in the County of York, in said state by the Rev. Mr. Evans on the 14th day of December 1799 as will appear to date by her Family Register enclosed; which is a true copy from the Register in her Family Bible – and her marriage will also probably appear by the Marriage Bond and Ministers Return, as the duty officer in the County of York as aforesaid.
That her husband the aforesaid Carter Page died in said County, on the 9th day of April 1825 – leaving declarant his widow – (whose maiden name was Nelson) and who has remained unmarried ever since the time of her husbands [sic] as aforesaid to the present time. That she was not married to him prior to the expiration of his last term of service, but that the marriage took place previous to the 1st day of Jan'y 1800 and subsequent to the first day of Jan'y 1794 – all of which will more fully appear by reference to the proof annexed.
[signed] Lucy Page

as to date probably married husband interlineated before signed – [signed] Nelson Page JP
Sworn to and subscribed on the day and year above written –
Before Me -- [signed] Nelson Page JP
In presence of –
Peyton Harrison
Lucy J. Cushing

[f p. 7]
An excerpt from the family Bible states, "Carter Page & Lucy Nelson were married at York on the 14th December 1799."

[f p. 26]
In the House of Delegates
The 26th of May 1784
It appearing that Carter Page was early in the year 1777 appointed a Lieutenant in Colonel Baylors Regiment of Cavalry, and the year following was promoted to the Rank of Captain, in which capacity he acted until in the year 1779 when he resigned and that he acted as aid de camp to
General Nelson in the year 1780 & 1781. Resolved that the Petition of the said Carter Page praying that he may be allowed the same Bounty in Lands as is by law given to a Captain is reasonable.
Test:
S/ John Backley, C. H. D.

1784 June 24th
Agreed to by the Senate
S/ Will Drew C. S.
[the above certified on October 4, 1849 by the clerk of the house of Delegates as a true copy from its records.]
[f p. 32]
This is to Certify, That it appears from a List in this Office of such Officers and Soldiers of the Virginia Continental Line, during the Revolutionary War, as settled their Accounts, and received Certificates for the balance of their Full Pay, according to an Act of Assembly, passed the November Session 1781, that a Certificate issued on the 8th day of January 1783, in the name of Carter Page as a Captain of Cavalry for £310.10.8, which Certificate appears to have been delivered to himself and was given for services prior to the 1st January 1782. To wit – Pay as Lieutenant of Dragoons from 6 Feby 77 to 1st March 78 & as Captain from 1st March 78 to 4th [?] June 1779
Given under my hand, at the Auditor's Office, Richmond, this
20th day of June 1849.
S/ Jas E. Heath, AUDITOR

[f p. 8]
Justice of the Peace John C. Page submitted a declaration stating that he was the son of Carter Page from an earlier marriage and that Carter Page, " … was always, since my earliest recollection, reputed and esteemed to have been a Captain of Cavalry during the Revolutionary War and made a
Major by Brevet about the close of said war. I have also frequently seen him in Company with officers of the Revolution and he was always recognized as one of them, and have heard him and them conversing on scenes and Battles of the Revolution in which they were companions in arms. Especially I recollect witnessing a meeting between my said Father and General LaFayette when on his last visit to the Country , in which LaFayette recognized him as Captain Page and spoke of valuable services rendered to the Country by him in that character, during the Revolutionary War. Given under my hand and seal this 26
th June [?] 1849
[signed] John C. Page J. P."

Susan Page and Judith Nelson, the sisters of Lucy Page, gave a written statement under oath that they attended the wedding of Carter Page and Lucy Nelson on December 14, 1799, and further that they, "recollect the date of it perfectly, it being the day on which General Washington died." [p. 10]
[A letter at pp. 12-14 dated April 30, 1940, from an assistant to the administrator summarizes Carter Page's service record, as follows:]
"Carter Page entered the service early in the Revolutionary War, place of residence at the time he entered the service not shown, and was in the battle of Princeton: no details of this service given: February 6, 1777, he was appointed lieutenant in Colonel Baylor's Regiment of Dragoons: was promoted captain March 1, 1778: resigned his commission, June 4, 1779: he was in the battles of Brandywine and Germantown: in 1780 and 1781, he served as aide-de-camp to General Thomas Nelson and was in the battle of Guilford Court House, and at the siege of Yorktown and surrender of Lord Cornwallis. It was stated that he was appointed major by brevet about the close of the war.
He died April 9, 1825, in Cumberland County, Virginia, then in the sixty-seventh year of his age."

The family record [p. 9] lists the children by Carter and Lucy Page, as,
Thomas Nelson Page born October 26, 1800, died November 2, 1800
Nelson Page born November 8, 1802
William Nelson Page born February 28, 1803
Lucy Jane Page born April 6, 1804
Robert Burwell Page born April 20, 1806
Thomas Page born June 6, 1807
Mary Maria Page born September 5, 1813

[f p. 5: miscellaneous family record:
John Cary Page & Mary Anna Trent were married [indecipherable] 12th 1808
Lavinia Anderson Born June 20th 1809
Mary Ann Page born May 1811
Virginia Randolph Page August 17th 1813
Elizabeth Trent born October 1815
Allen Cary Page born June 19th 1817
John Alexander Trent November 1819
Maria Willis January 18 1822
Archibald Carey April 22nd 1824
Harriet Randolph 1827
John Cary February 22nd 183_
Edward Trent May 183_]

Lucy Page was granted a widow's pension of $526.00 per annum, commencing March 4, 1848 [p.2]
================================
Burial at this cemetery was identified by Warren Cushng - FAG member 48364069)




Family links:
Parents:
Thomas Nelson (1738 - 1789)
Lucy Grymes Nelson (1743 - 1830)

Spouse:
Carter Page (1758 - 1825)

Children:
Lucy Jane Page Cushing (1804 - 1872)*
Mary Maria Page Dame (1813 - 1895)*

Siblings:
William Nelson (1763 - 1801)*
Thomas Nelson (1764 - 1804)*
Philip Nelson (1766 - 1851)*
Francis Nelson (1767 - 1833)*
Hugh Nelson (1768 - 1836)*
Elizabeth Nelson Page (1770 - 1853)*
Lucy Nelson Page (1777 - 1863)
Robert Nelson (1778 - 1818)*
Susanna Nelson Page (1780 - 1850)*
Judith Nelson Nelson (1782 - 1869)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Fork Episcopal Church Cemetery
Doswell
Hanover County
Virginia, USA

Created by: Thomas
Record added: Mar 06, 2013
Find A Grave Memorial# 106294671 
NELSON, Lucy (I500122)
 
32 Owner of The Annapolis Inn
father of Sally Scott Murray, who married the tyrannical Edward Lloyd, who was once a Repubican Gov. of Md. and Senator of Md 
Murray, Dr. James (I30)
 
33 Plaque: Here lyeth the body of Judith Carter the wife of
Robert Carter, Esq., and oldest daughter of the Honorable Jno. Armistead, Esq., and Judith his wife. She departed this life the 23rd. day of February Anno 1699, in the [34]th year of her age, and in the eleventh year of her marriage having borne to her husband five children, four daughters and a son, two whereof Sarah and Judith Carter, died before, and are buried near her. Piously she lived, and comfortbly died, in the joyful assurance of a happy Eternity, leaving to her friends the sweet perfume of a good reputation.

Family links:
Spouse:
Robert King Carter (1663 - 1732)*

Children:
Judith Carter*
Sarah Carter*
Elizabeth Carter Burwell Nicholas (1688 - 1734)*
John Carter (1690 - 1742)*
Judith Carter Page (1695 - 1750)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Christ Church Cemetery
Weems
Lancaster County
Virginia, USA

Maintained by: My roots are showing
Originally Created by: Beverly Davis Valcovic
Record added: May 31, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 14461294 
Armistead, Judith (I100)
 
34 Plaque: To the memory of Betty Carter , Second wife of Robert Carter, Esq., youngest daughter of Thomas Landon, Esq., and Mary, his wife, of Grednal in the county of Herford, the ancient seat of the family and place of her nativity.

She bore to her husband ten children, five sons and five daughters, three of whom Sarah, Betty, and Ludlow died before her and are buried near her.

She was a person of great and exemplary piety and charity in every relation wherein she stood, whethered considered as a Christian, a wife, a mother, a mistress, a neighbor, or a friend, her conduct was equalled by few, excelled by none.

She changed this life for a better on the 3rd. of July, 1719, in the 36 year of her age, and 19th of her marriage.

May her descends make their mother's virtues and graces the pattern of their lives and actions.


Family links:
Spouse:
Robert King Carter (1663 - 1732)*

Children:
Anne Carter Harrison (1704 - 1745)*
Robert Carter (1704 - 1732)*
Betty Carter (1705 - ____)*
Ludlow Carter (1708 - 1708)*
Landon Carter (1710 - 1778)*
Mary Carter Braxton (1712 - 1736)*
Lucy Carter Harrison (1715 - 1763)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Christ Church Cemetery
Weems
Lancaster County
Virginia, USA

Maintained by: Anne Critcher Clark
Originally Created by: Beverly Davis Valcovic
Record added: May 31, 2006
Find A Grave Memorial# 14461259
 
Landon, Elizabeth "Betty" (I99)
 
35 Ran a boarding house next to the University of Virginia for about 50 years. She also ran a tea house restaurant, often called the best place to eat by the students. The street on which they lived was named Elliewood Avenue by the students because Eliza's daughter, Ellie Wood played up and down that street. Mason, Eliza Chew (I1000196)
 
36 Robert King Carter son of John Carter and Sarah Ludlow
Robert King Carter married 1680 Virginia, to Judith Armistead.From the "ENCYCLOPEDIA of VIRGINIA BIOGRAPHY" Under the Editorial Supervision of
Lyon Gardiner Tyler, LL. D., VOLUME V, 1915, pages 848-849

"The epitaph on his tomb in Christ Church, records his virtues and achievements.
Translated from the Latin, it says:

Here lies Robert Carter an honorable man who by noble endowments and pure morals gave luster to his gentle birth.
Rector of William and Mary College, he sustained that institution and its
most trying times. And he was Speaker of the House of Burgesses and Treasurer under the most serene princes, William, Ann, George I. and George II. Elected by the House of Burgesses its Speaker six years and Governor of the Colony for more than a year he upheld equally the regal dignity and the public freedom.
Possessed of ample wealth, blameless acquired, he built and endowed this
sacred edifice, a signal monument of his piety towards God. He furnished it
richly. Entertaining his friends kindly, he was neither a prodigal nor a
parsimonious host.
His first wife was Judith, daughter of John Armistead, Esq. His second,
Betty, a descendant of the noble house of Landon. By these wives he had many children and whose education he expended large sums of money.
At length, full of honors and of years, when he had well performed all the
duties of an exemplary life he departed from this world on the 4th of August,
1732, in the 69th year of his age.
The unhappy lament their lost comforter, the widows their lost protector, and
the orphans their lost father."

Family links:
Parents:
John Carter (1613 - 1669)
Sarah Ludlow Carter (1635 - 1668)

Spouses:
Judith Armistead Carter (1665 - 1699)
Elizabeth Landon Carter (1683 - 1719)

Children:
Sarah Carter*
Judith Carter*
Elizabeth Carter Burwell Nicholas (1688 - 1734)*
John Carter (1690 - 1742)*
Judith Carter Page (1695 - 1750)*
Robert Carter (1704 - 1732)*
Anne Carter Harrison (1704 - 1745)*
Betty Carter (1705 - ____)*
Ludlow Carter (1708 - 1708)*
Landon Carter (1710 - 1778)*
Mary Carter Braxton (1712 - 1736)*
Lucy Carter Harrison (1715 - 1763)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Christ Church Cemetery
Weems
Lancaster County
Virginia, USA

Created by: Pat Sproat
Record added: May 21, 2007
Find A Grave Memorial# 19474872
 
Carter, Robert King (I97)
 
37 Walking through the rooms of this house transports you back in time over two centuries to the days of the American Revolutionary War. Originally, 142 and 144 Prince George Street was one residence. The core of these two residences started as a double-pike, center-passage dwelling erected in the 1770s. With the growth of Annapolis in the late 19th century, a number of lots and dwellings in the older section of the city were subdivided to provide more housing and commercial stock. Such was the destiny of this two-story brick dwelling in the mid-1880s as the owner added an entrance bay to the northeast and partitioned the old section of the house to create two side-passage residences. The break in the brickwork caused by this radical reconfiguration of the house was masked on the exterior by stucco that obscured the header bond of the original section.

Mr. Thomas Rutland was the builder and original owner of this building. It was during the 1770s that Mr. Thomas Rutland constructed this 50 by 32-foot, five-bay, brick dwelling on the northeast side of Prince George Street. The front elevation was laid in header bond while the rear and sidewalls were faced in English bond, a mid to late 18th-century decorative fashion characteristic of the region. The division between the first and second floors is demarcated by a four-course header bond belt course along the rear façade, a treatment that was almost certainly repeated originally on the front as well. The two-story walls rise above an English bond foundation with a stepped water table.

The original plan consisted of a center stair passage with a pair of flanking rooms on each side. Unlike many Annapolis houses of this scale, the two principal entertaining rooms faced the street front while the two smaller rooms were located to the rear. Internal chimneys located on the gable walls heated all four rooms. Little is known of the original finish of these rooms as they were completely renovated by a subsequent owner in the second quarter of the 19th century. The only surviving interior element from the first period of construction is an enriched plaster cornice on the first floor entertaining rooms and the original center stair passage similar in style to other late colonial examples in the city. The cymatium features an egg-and-dart band while the soffit of the corona consists of alternating modillions and pateras. The bed molding as a fret and rope motif along with a torus-shaped picture molding.

Apparently, Mr. Rutland faced financial reverses and was forced to sell the house to Dr. James Murray in 1785. For part of his career, Dr. Murray was the physician to President Thomas Jefferson. Several of his sons-in-law were signers of The Declaration of Independence. Yes, they did sleep here! ; The 1798 Federal Direct tax assessed Murray $1,200 for this lot which contained the dwelling, a one-story brick kitchen measuring 16 by 32 feet, a 16 foot square brick medical shop, and an 8 by 10 foot brick smokehouse.
 
Murray, Dr. James (I30)